How to prepare for your MIC training

Sam Leary with clients on Ledge Route

The five day Mountaineering Instructor Certificate training course is a fast-paced practical week that combines technical input with plenty of climbing and mountaineering as well as focusing on teaching and client management in whatever conditions are thrown your way.

Over the years we have learned that candidates who are fit and well prepared for the training reap greater benefits from the course. Without exception, candidates find the course tiring, both physically and mentally, because all five days include a mix of practical and theoretical or technical sessions and most evenings include further sessions or your own practice.

To help you operate safely and effectively on the training course, and to maximise your learning, we recommend using this checklist:
  • I have updated my logbook to accurately reflect experience post successful Winter Mountain Leader and Mountaineering Instructor Award assessments.
  • I have confidently led grade three winter climbs (or above) within the month leading up to my training course.
  • I have led a variety of easier graded climbs and mountaineering routes, (ideally roped for some or all).
  • I have recent leadership experience as a Winter Mountain Leader and Mountaineering Instructor.
  • I am fit enough to cope with five continuous big days on the hill.
If your registration has been approved but you are not sure that you are ready for training please speak to someone at Mountain Training or the training provider.

You could also consider hiring or shadowing a qualified and current mountaineering instructor (e.g. member of the Association of Mountaineering Instructors – AMI) or a British Mountain Guide, to gain insights into working practice. After your training, you may consider extending this into a mentoring role to help you consolidate your learning and prepare for assessment.

Tim Neill climbing in the Cairngorms cMarkWalker